office365

#21: What is the Microsoft Office Autosave Feature?

Microsoft Office Autosave FeatureIn this episode of The Power Up Project, we cover:

〉There is a new Autosave Feature in the desktop versions of Microsoft Office apps

〉What you need to look out for in your workflows if you’re used to the traditional saving methods Microsoft Office

 

 

Transcript:

In this episode of The Power Up Project, we talk about the new auto save feature in the Microsoft Office apps.

Hey, welcome to The Power Up Project. I’m your host for this episode, Ben love. So, Microsoft have just released a great, new little feature into the Microsoft Office apps. By that I mean Word and Excel and so on, that you use as part of your Microsoft Office 365 subscription.

The new feature that they’ve released is auto save. Now, this is something that those people who’ve been using the web app versions of this software for a little while now will be very familiar with, but it is new to those of us who are using the desktop installations of Word and Excel and so on. Essentially, what it means is that rather than having to remember to click save on your documents progressively as you’re using them, the system simply automatically saves your changes as you type. It literally does it in near real time. So, it’s a constant type thing.

Now, I personally think this is a fantastic feature. Like I said, I’ve been relying on this feature for a while now, when I use the web apps of Word and Excel, which I do a fair bit. But it’s great that it’s now there with those desktop apps. You can tell if you’ve got it and if it’s turned on by having a look in the very top left hand corner of your application.

For example, if you have Microsoft Word open, have a look in the very top left corner there when you’ve got a document open in Word, and there’ll be a little toggle switch, which turns auto save on and off. Now, it does default to on and it will really only work actually for documents that are saved in your OneDrive or that are saved within SharePoint. But honestly, for a lot of us, that’s really where our documents are all saved these days. For those people, it’s just going to be there automatically for you.

If you do have your document saved on a traditional file server, for example, or if you have it saved locally on your computer on the C: drive, for example, the auto save feature is not going to do what it should. It’s not going to be able to work its magic.

Now, this sounds like a great new feature. But anecdotally this is catching a couple of people unawares. The particular situation here is if you’re the sort of person who takes an existing document and uses that almost like a template. You might open up an existing letter that you had written to a client, you might make some changes to that for different client, and then you might click on the Save As button, and save a new version of that for the new client.

Now, that was all well and good when we had to click on the Save button. But if you think about that, what’s happening now is that with auto save turned on as you’re typing, you’re actually going to be saving those changes over the top of your original letter, and you probably don’t want to be doing that if this is the way you’ve been using your documents.

If you’re the sort of person who does that, if you do open up a previous document that you’ve used and intend to use that almost like a template for a different purpose, what I’d suggest you do is maybe copy that document first. Copy paste, duplicate that document on the file system and then open up the copy so that you can do that auto save. Either that or as soon as you open up that document, before you start making your edits, click on Save As and save it as a new document. So that as auto save then does its thing, you will not lose that original content.

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